It is as simple as adding to figure out that if you tend to have a lead foot when driving on the highway, your traffic violation point balance may result in the suspension of your drivers’ license.  You will also face higher insurance premiums with a driving conviction on your record.

The North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles point system assigns a variety of point values for their penalties. For example, speeding or running a red light is a three-point penalty, while passing a stopped school bus is a five-point penalty. While participation in a driver improvement clinic can shave three points off of your record, it can only do so once every five years. Fighting your traffic tickets gives you a second chance to keep your driving record clean or at least avoid a license suspension.

Easy To Accumulate

If you accumulate 12 or more points in three years, you will get your driver’s license suspended. The initial suspension is for 60 days, the second suspension is for six months and any further suspensions are one year long each. After license reinstatement, earning eight points in the subsequent three-year period will result in a second suspension.

Speeding Conviction Revocations

In addition to license suspensions tied to a point penalty system, speeding convictions have their own discipline levels.  Driving over 15 miles over the speed limit or over 80 miles per hour can get your license suspended. The first revocation is for 30 days and a second occurrence within 12 months gets a revocation of 60 days. A conviction of both speeding and reckless driving at the same time will suspend your license for 60 days as well. If you have more than one speeding conviction going over 55 miles per hour within 12 months, you lose your license to drive for up to six months.

Motorists that wish to improve their driving record often retain legal counsel that is experienced in traffic violation defense. The gains made by challenging tickets in court can mean the difference between keeping and losing driving privileges.